“PRINTING THE WORLD” EXHIBITION AT THE POMPIDOU CENTRE IN PARIS

ACQUISITION OF THE WORK BY THE POMPIDOU CENTRE

It can be viewed at the ‘Imprimer le monde’ (Printing the world) exhibition – From 15 March to 3 July 2017 – Paris

 

Mathias Bengtsson
Growth Table Titanium, 2016
Titanium, 3D printing
(EBM®-Electron Beam Melting)
81 x 140 x 66 cm

Pompidou Centre, the national museum of modern art / industrial design centre, Paris. Produced with the support of Initial (Prodways group) and the Maria Wettergren gallery. Purchased thanks to the support of the De Gaulle Fleurance & Partners law firm and the Society of Friends of the National Museum of Modern Art’s Acquisition Committee for Design.

 

 

“I try to create a universe where we can generate and grow forms, like in nature.” Mathias Bengtsson was born in 1971 in Copenhagen and now lives and works in Stockholm.

PIONEERING EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH

To create this work, Mathias Bengtsson developed new simulation software using a grid with around 1000 constraint parameters: mass, energy, gravity, pressure, etc. in which he leaves algorithms to develop.

This process interprets the model of bone growth through cell division and differentiation. The performances of living organisms are analysed and applied to the performances of materials to generate new complex forms that raise questions about the boundaries between design, art, craftsmanship and scientific research.

MANUFACTURING WITH TITANIUM AT INITIAL

Through this technological and artistic challenge, the artist Mathias Bengtsson was able to rely on Initial’s more than 25 years of experience and unrivalled expertise in 3D printing.

The Growth Table Titanium was a result of pioneering experimental research and was manufactured with titanium using the additive manufacturing process – EBM® called Electron Beam Melting – which has the particularity of using an electron beam to produce parts by melting metal powder, notably used in the aviation and defence industries.

Initial was entrusted with developing the Growth Table Titanium. The work required 310 hours of manufacturing and is made up of 22 titanium parts. A technical feat was required for this unusual project: a unique and made to measure piece.

MATHIAS BENGTSSON’S CREATIONS

Mathias Bengtsson’s creations (Slice Chair, Spun Chair, Growth Chair, 1998) combine craftsmanship and high technology. Mathias Bengtsson is one of the most innovative designers when it comes to digital technologies, which he uses to design objects with complex forms out of new materials.

BIOGRAPHY

Mathias Bengtsson (born in 1971 in Copenhagen, and now lives and works in Stockholm) studied at the Royal College of Art as well as the Danish Design School in Copenhagen.

After he set up his studio in 2002, he moved to Stockholm in 2007. His creations (Slice Chair, 1998, Spun Chair, 2002, Cellular Chair, 2011, Growth Chair, 2012) combine craftsmanship and high technology and push back the sculptural, technical and philosophical possibilities of three-dimensional design.

Mathias Bengtsson is one of the most innovative designers when it comes to digital technologies, which he uses to design objects with complex forms out of new materials.

His ‘computational design’ is based on an algorithm language, which is similar to the approach of architects where forms are generated with parametric calculations.

MATHIAS BENGTSSON IS INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNISED FOR HIS VISUALLY STRIKING AND TECHNICALLY INNOVATIVE SCULPTURAL WORKS.

Working with various processes and industrial materials, Bengtsson is always pushing the sculptural, technical and philosophical possibilities of three-dimensional designs forward. He is constantly looking for new possibilities in terms of expression, and he overturns the established boundaries between design, art, craftsmanship and new technologies.

Museum collections: Centre Pompidou, Paris France ; MoMA, Museum of Modern Art, New York, USA ; 
The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, USA ; The Mint Museum of Art, North Carolina, USA ; 
High Museum of Art, Atlanta, USA ; Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indianapolis, USA ; 
Montreal Museum of Art, Montreal, Canada
 ; Frank Cohan Collection, Manchester, UK ; 
Manchester Art Gallery, Manchester, UK ; 
The Lowery, Manchester, UK ; 
Cass Sculpture Foundation, West Sussex, UK ; 
Röhsska Museet, Goteborg, Sweden
 ; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, Holland
; Danish Museum of Decorative Arts, Copenhagen, Denmark.

MARIA WETTERGREN GALLERY

Maria Wettergren, the Danish gallery owner, opened her own gallery in Paris in 2010, having run the Galerie Dansk Moebelkunst in Paris for 8 years. She has since exhibited works there by the new scene’s most important Scandinavian designers and artists.

Three years after opening the Parisian gallery, Maria Wettergren joined the ranks of the Power 100 in the American magazine Art & Auction. In 2014, the gallery owner received the Finn Juhl Prize for her promotion of Scandinavian design internationally. The artistic direction of the gallery is characterised by a taste for free experimentation, whether scientific, technological or craftsmanship, which translates into works which completely remove the boundaries between art, craftsmanship and design. 

THE PATRONAGE OF THE DE GAULLE FLEURANCE & PARTNERS LAW FIRM

Louis de Gaulle, a legal partner: “Supporting Mathias Bengtsson’s Growth Table Titanium project is the opportunity to demonstrate our position at the vanguard of intellectual property and new technology issues”.

Artists have seized upon additive manufacturing as a new creative tool. This technique also attracts engineers, businesses and others interested in its industrial and commercial potential, and this has many legal implications, and first and foremost with regard to intellectual property law (copyright, patents, trademarks and designs and models) which protect any form of creation, ensuring the regulation, inspection and sanction of any reproduction of a work or object not authorised by its beneficiary.

“To pave the way for a work of art to inform the legal issues surrounding 3D printing.”